How time flies! – Idioms

how time flies

Time seems to move very or more quickly. “My, how time flies” can also be used. Wow, it’s midnight already? I feel like we just got here. How time flies! I can’t believe your kid is about to graduate high school. How time flies.

time flies

Time seems to move very or more quickly. (Often used in the phrase “time flies when you’re having fun.”) Wow, it’s midnight already? I feel like we just got here. Time flies when you’re having fun! I can’t believe your kid is about to graduate high school. Time sure flies.

Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(My,) how time flies.

 

1. Time has gone by quickly, it is time for me to go. Bill: Look at the clock! Mary: How time flies! I guess you’ll be going. Bill: Yes, I have to get up early. John: My watch says it’s nearly midnight. How time flies! Jane: Yes, it’s late. We really must go.

2. Time passes quickly. (Said especially when talking about how children grow and develop.) “Look at how big Billy is getting,” said Uncle Michael. “My, how time flies.” Tom: It seems it was just yesterday that I graduated from high school. Now I’m a grandfather. Mary: My, how time flies.

time flies (when you’re having fun)

Fig. time passes very quickly. (From the Latin tempus fugit.) I didn’t really think it was so late when the party ended. Doesn’t time fly? Time simply flew while the old friends exchanged news.

McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

time flies

Time passes quickly, as in It’s midnight already? Time flies when you’re having fun, or I guess it’s ten years since I last saw you-how time flies. This idiom was first recorded about 1800 but Shakespeare used a similar phrase, “the swiftest hours, as they flew,” as did Alexander Pope, “swift fly the years.”

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

time ˈflies

(saying) time seems to pass very quickly: How time flies! I’ve got to go now.Time has flown since I started working here.This is a translation of the Latin phrase ‘tempus fugit’.

Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

time flies

Time moves swiftly onward. Time was said to fly or flee by numerous ancients, especially the Romans, for whom Tempus fugit (translated as “time flies,” although it also means “flees”) was a well-known proverb. Chaucer wrote, “For though we sleep or wake, or rome, or ryde, Ay fleeth the tyme, it nil no man abyde” (The Clerk’s Tale). Occasionally the term was amplified, such as “Time flies as swiftly as an arrow” (in Ken Hoshino’s translation of Kaibaka Ekken’s Ten Kun, 1710). Today we sometimes say, how time flies, occasionally amplified (either seriously or satirically) with when you’re having fun.

The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

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