definition of Winde by The Free Dictionary

wind

(pronounced wind) to change direction; meander: The creek winds through the woods.

Not to be confused with:

wend – to proceed or go: She had to wend her way through the crowd.

Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

wind 1

 (wĭnd)

n.

1.

a. Moving air, especially a natural and perceptible movement of air parallel to or along the ground.

b. A movement of air generated artificially, as by bellows or a fan.

2.

a. The direction from which a movement of air comes: The wind is north-northwest.

b. A movement of air coming from one of the four cardinal points of the compass: the four winds.

3. Moving air carrying sound, an odor, or a scent.

4.

a. Breath, especially normal or adequate breathing; respiration: had the wind knocked out of them.

b. Gas produced in the stomach or intestines during digestion; flatulence.

5. often winds Music

a. The brass and woodwinds sections of a band or orchestra.

b. Wind instruments or their players considered as a group.

c. Woodwinds.

6.

a. Something that disrupts or destroys: the winds of war.

b. A tendency; a trend: the winds of change.

7. Information, especially of something concealed; intimation: Trouble will ensue if wind of this scandal gets out.

8.

a. Speech or writing empty of meaning; verbiage: His remarks on the subject are nothing but wind.

b. Vain self-importance; pomposity: an expert who was full of wind even before becoming famous.

tr.v. wind·ed, wind·ing, winds

1. To expose to free movement of air; ventilate or dry.

2.

a. To detect the smell of; catch a scent of.

b. To pursue by following a scent.

3. To cause to be out of or short of breath.

4. To afford a recovery of breath: stopped to wind and water the horses.

Idioms:

before the wind Nautical

In the same direction the wind is blowing.

close to/near the wind

1. Nautical As close as possible to the direction the wind is blowing from.

2. Close to danger.

down the wind

Nautical Downwind.

in the wind

Likely to occur; in the offing: Big changes are in the wind.

into the wind

Nautical In the same or nearly the same direction as the wind is blowing from.

off the wind Nautical

In a direction that is not as close as possible to the direction the wind is blowing from.

on the wind Nautical

Close to the wind.

take the wind out of (one’s) sails

To rob of an advantage; deflate.

under the wind

1. Nautical To the leeward.

2. In a location protected from the wind.

up the wind Nautical

Upwind.



wind 2

 (wīnd)

v. wound (wound), wind·ing, winds

v.tr.

1. To wrap (something) around a center or another object once or repeatedly: wind string around a spool.

2. To wrap or encircle (an object) in a series of coils; entwine: wound her injured leg with a bandage; wound the waist of the gown with lace and ribbons.

3.

a. To go along (a curving or twisting course): wind a path through the mountains.

b. To proceed on (one’s way) with a curving or twisting course.

4. To introduce in a disguised or devious manner; insinuate: He wound a plea for money into his letter.

5. To turn (a crank, for example) in a series of circular motions.

6.

a. To coil the spring of (a mechanism) by turning a stem or cord, for example: wind a watch.

b. To coil (thread, for example), as onto a spool or into a ball.

c. To remove or unwind (thread, for example), as from a spool: wound the line off the reel.

7. To lift or haul by means of a windlass or winch: Wind the pail to the top of the well.

v.intr.

1. To move in or have a curving or twisting course: a river winding through a valley.

2.

a. To move in or have a spiral or circular course: a column of smoke winding into the sky.

b. To be coiled or spiraled: The vine wound about the trellis.

3. To be twisted or whorled into curved forms.

4. To proceed misleadingly or insidiously in discourse or conduct.

5. To become wound: a clock that winds with difficulty.

n.

1. The act of winding.

2. A single turn, twist, or curve.

Phrasal Verbs:

wind down

1. To diminish or cause to diminish gradually in energy, intensity, or scope: The party wound down as guests began to leave.

2. To relax; unwind.

wind up

1. To come or bring to a finish; end: when the meeting wound up; wind up a project.

2. To put in order; settle: wound up her affairs before leaving the country.

3. To arrive in a place or situation after or because of a course of action: took a long walk and wound up at the edge of town; overspent and wound up in debt.

4. Baseball To swing back the arm and raise the foot in preparation for pitching the ball.


[Middle English winden, from Old English windan.]


wind 3

 (wīnd, wĭnd)

tr.v. wind·ed (wīn′dĭd, wĭn′-) or wound (wound), wind·ing, winds Music

1. To blow (a wind instrument).

2. To sound by blowing.



wind′er n.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wind

(wɪnd)

n

1. (Physical Geography) a current of air, sometimes of considerable force, moving generally horizontally from areas of high pressure to areas of low pressure. See also Beaufort scale

2. (Physical Geography) chiefly poetic the direction from which a wind blows, usually a cardinal point of the compass

3. (General Engineering) air artificially moved, as by a fan, pump, etc

4. any sweeping and destructive force

5. a trend, tendency, or force: the winds of revolution.

6. informal a hint; suggestion: we got wind that you were coming.

7. something deemed insubstantial: his talk was all wind.

8. breath, as used in respiration or talk: you’re just wasting wind.

9. (Physiology) (often used in sports) the power to breathe normally: his wind is weak. See also second wind
10. (Instruments) music

a. a wind instrument or wind instruments considered collectively

b. (often plural) the musicians who play wind instruments in an orchestra

c. (modifier) of, relating to, or composed of wind instruments: a wind ensemble.

11. (Physiology) an informal name for flatus

12. (Hunting) the air on which the scent of an animal is carried to hounds or on which the scent of a hunter is carried to his quarry

13. (Nautical Terms) the part of a vessel’s hull below the water line that is exposed by rolling or by wave action

14. any point particularly susceptible to attack or injury

15. (Physiology) break wind to release intestinal gas through the anus

16. get the wind up have the wind up informal to become frightened

17. (Hunting) have in the wind to be in the act of following (quarry) by scent

18. how the wind blows how the wind lies which way the wind blows which way the wind lies what appears probable

19. in the wind about to happen

20. (Brewing) three sheets in the wind informal intoxicated; drunk

21. (Nautical Terms) in the teeth of the wind in the eye of the wind directly into the wind

22. into the wind against the wind or upwind

23. (Nautical Terms) off the wind nautical away from the direction from which the wind is blowing

24. (Nautical Terms) on the wind nautical as near as possible to the direction from which the wind is blowing

25. put the wind up informal to frighten or alarm

26. (Banking & Finance) raise the wind informal Brit to obtain the necessary funds

27. sail close to the wind sail near to the wind

a. to come near the limits of danger or indecency

b. to live frugally or manage one’s affairs economically

28. take the wind out of someone’s sails to destroy someone’s advantage; disconcert or deflate

vb (tr)

29. (Pathology) to cause (someone) to be short of breath: the blow winded him.

30. (Hunting)

a. to detect the scent of

b. to pursue (quarry) by following its scent

31. (Physiology) to cause (a baby) to bring up wind after feeding by patting or rubbing on the back

32. to expose to air, as in drying, ventilating, etc

[Old English wind; related to Old High German wint, Old Norse vindr, Gothic winds, Latin ventus]

ˈwindless adj

ˈwindlessly adv

ˈwindlessness n


wind

(waɪnd)

vb, winds, winding or wound

1. (Textiles) (often foll by: around, about, or upon) to turn or coil (string, cotton, etc) around some object or point or (of string, etc) to be turned etc, around some object or point: he wound a scarf around his head.

2. (tr) to twine, cover, or wreathe by or as if by coiling, wrapping, etc; encircle: we wound the body in a shroud.

3. (Mechanical Engineering) (often foll by: up) to tighten the spring of (a clockwork mechanism)

4. (foll by: off) to remove by uncoiling or unwinding

5. (usually intr) to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course: the river winds through the hills.

6. (tr) to introduce indirectly or deviously: he is winding his own opinions into the report.

7. (tr) to cause to twist or revolve: he wound the handle.

8. (General Engineering) (tr; usually foll by up or down) to move by cranking: please wind up the window.

9. (Mechanical Engineering) (tr) to haul, lift, or hoist (a weight, etc) by means of a wind or windlass

10. (Building) (intr) (of a board, etc) to be warped or twisted

11. (intr) archaic to proceed deviously or indirectly

n

12. the act of winding or state of being wound

13. a single turn, bend, etc: a wind in the river.

14. (Building) Also called: winding a twist in a board or plank

[Old English windan; related to Old Norse vinda, Old High German wintan (German winden)]

ˈwindable adj


wind

(waɪnd)

vb, winds, winding, winded or wound

(Music, other) (tr) poetic to blow (a note or signal) on (a horn, bugle, etc)

[C16: special use of wind1]

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wind1

(n. wɪnd, Literary waɪnd; v. wɪnd)

n.

1. air in natural motion, as that moving horizontally at any velocity along the earth’s surface, caused by temperature differentials in air.

2. a gale; storm; hurricane.

3. any stream of air, as that produced by a bellows or fan.

5. wind instruments collectively, as distinguished from percussion and strings.

6. winds, the members of a band or orchestra playing wind instruments.

7. breath or breathing: to catch one’s wind.

8. the power of breathing freely, as during continued exertion.

9. any influential force or trend: the winds of public opinion.

10. a hint or intimation: to catch wind of a stock split.

11. air carrying an animal’s odor or scent.

12. empty talk; mere words.

13. vanity; conceit.

14. gas generated in the stomach and intestines.

v.t.

15. to expose to wind or air.

16. to follow by the scent.

17. to make short of wind or breath, as by vigorous exercise.

18. to let recover breath, as by resting after exertion.

v.i.

19. to catch the scent or odor of game.

Idioms:

1. how or which way the wind blows or lies, what the tendency or probability is.

2. in the teeth or eye of the wind, directly into or against the wind.

3. in the wind, about to occur; impending.

4. off the wind,

a. away from the wind; with the wind at one’s back.

b. (of a sailing vessel) headed into the wind with sails shaking or aback.

5. on the or a wind, as close as possible to the wind.

6. sail close to the wind,

a. to sail as nearly as possible in the direction from which the wind is blowing.

b. to practice economy in one’s affairs.

c. to verge on a breach of propriety or decency.

d. to take a risk.

7. take the wind out of one’s sails, to destroy one’s self-assurance; disconcert or deflate one.

[before 900; Middle English (n.), Old English, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon wind, Old High German wint, Old Norse vindr, Gothic winds, Latin ventus]

syn: wind, breeze, zephyr, gust, blast refer to a current of air set in motion naturally. wind applies to air in motion, blowing with any degree of gentleness or violence: a strong wind; a westerly wind. A breeze is usu. a cool, light wind; technically, it is a wind of 4–31 mph: a refreshing breeze. zephyr, a literary word, refers to a soft, mild breeze: a zephyr whispering through palm trees. A gust is a sudden, brief rush of air: A gust of wind scattered the leaves. A blast is a brief but more violent rush of air, usu. a cold one: a wintry blast.

wind2

(waɪnd)

v. wound (waʊnd) or (Rare) wind•ed (ˌwaɪn dɪd) wind•ing; v.i.

1. to take a frequently bending course; change direction; meander: The stream winds through the forest.

2. to have a circular or spiral course or direction.

3. to coil or twine about something.

4. to proceed circuitously or indirectly.

5. to undergo winding or winding up.

6. to be twisted or warped, as a board.

v.t.

7. to encircle or wreathe, as with something twined, wrapped, or placed about.

8. to roll or coil (thread, string, etc.) into a ball, on a spool, or the like (often fol. by up).

9. to remove or take off by unwinding (usu. fol. by off or from): to wind thread off a bobbin.

10. to twine, fold, wrap, or place about something.

11. to make (a mechanism) operational by turning a key, crank, etc. (often fol. by up): to wind a clock.

12. to haul or hoist by means of a winch, windlass, or the like (often fol. by up).

13. to make (one’s or its way) in a bending or curving course.

14. to make (one’s or its way) by indirect, stealthy, or devious procedure: wound his way into our confidence.

15. wind down,

a. to bring or come to a gradual conclusion.

b. to calm down; relax.

16. wind up,

a. to bring or come to a conclusion: to wind up a campaign.

b. to end up: to wind up in jail.

c. to make tense or nervous; excite: She got all wound up before the game.

n.

17. the act of winding.

18. a single turn, twist, or bend of something wound.

19. a twist producing an uneven surface.

[before 900; Middle English; Old English windan, c. Old Saxon windan, Old High German wintan, Old Norse vinda, Gothic biwindan; akin to wend, wander]

wind3

(waɪnd, wɪnd)

v.t. wind•ed or wound (waʊnd) wind•ing.

1. to blow (a horn, etc.).

2. to sound by blowing.

[1375–1425; late Middle English; v. use of wind1, with inflection influenced by wind2]

WInd or W.Ind.,

West Indian.

Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

click for a larger image

wind

Global wind patterns are determined by differences in atmospheric pressure resulting from the uneven heating of the Earth’s surface by the sun. As warm, moist air rises along the equator, surface air moves in to take its place, creating the trade winds. Some of the air that descends at the two tropics moves away from the equator, creating the westerlies. The eastward and westward movement of these wind patterns is caused by the Earth’s clockwise rotation.

wind

(wĭnd)

A current of air, especially a natural one that moves along or parallel to the ground.

The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Wind

an abnormal fear of wind.

Rare. the recording of the measurement of wind speed by an anemometer. — anemographic, adj.

the science of the winds. — anemological, adj.

an instrument for indicating wind velocity.

the measurement of wind speed and direction, often by an anemometrograph. — anemometric, anemometrical, adj.

wind-loving, said of plants that are fertilized only through the action of winds. — anemophile, n.anemophilous, adj.

an abnormal fear of drafts or winds. — anemophobe, n.

an instrument for recording the direction of the wind.

a cold, dry wind that blows from the north or northeast in south central Europe.

a light wind, 4 to 27 knots on the Beaufort scale.

an atmospheric disturbance characterized by powerful winds spinning in the shape of a vertical cylinder or horizontal disk, accompanied by low pressure at the center. — cyclonic, adj.

the study of cyclones. — cyclonologist, n.

a warm, dry wind that blows down the side of a mountain, as on the north side of the Alps.

a strong wind, 28 to 55 knots on the Beaufort scale.

a heavy dust- or sandstorm of N. Africa, Arabia, and India.

a extremely strong wind, usually accompanied by foul weather, more than 65 knots on the Beaufort scale.

a strong east wind in the Mediterranean region.

a cold, dry wind that blows from the north in the south of France and vicinity.

a hot, dry, dust-bearing wind that blows from inland desert regions in southern California.

1. a hot, dry, dust-laden wind that blows on the northern Mediterranean coast from Africa.
2. a sultry southeast wind in the same regions.
3. a hot, oppressive wind of cyclonic origin, as in Kansas.

a highly localized, violent windstorm occurring over land, usually in the U.S. Midwest, characterized by a vertical, funnel-shaped cloud.

whirlwind.

a cyclone or hurricane in the western Pacific Ocean.

any wind that has a spinning motion and is conflned to a small area in the shape of a vertical cylinder.

-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wind

 wind instruments in an orchestra; their players collectively, 1876.

Examples: wind of adulation, 1480; of doctrines, 1526; of hope, 1591; of laughter, 1859; of passions, 1665; of praise, 1634.

Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wind

 

See Also: WEATHER

  1. Breeze [after a very hot day] … as torrid as the air from an oven —Ellen Glasgow
  2. The breeze flowed down on me, passing like a light hand —Louise Erdrich
  3. The breeze … sent little waves curling like lazy whips along the shingle [of a house] —John Fowles
  4. A breeze which came like a breath —Paul Horgan
  5. A draft … struck through his drenched clothes like ice cold needles —Cornell Woolrich
  6. A gathering wind sent the willows tossing like a jungle of buggy whips —William Styron
  7. High wind … like invisible icicles —Rebecca West
  8. Level winds as flat as ribbons —M. J. Farrell
  9. A northeaster roared down on us like a herd of drunken whales —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  10. A northeast wind which cut like a thousand razors —Frank Swinnerton

    See Also: PAIN

  11. A sandy wind blowing rough as an elephant —Truman Capote
  12. The sound of wind is like a flame —Yvor Winters
  13. The sunless evening wind slid down the mountain like an invisible river —Dorothy Canfield Fisher
  14. The night wind rushed like a thief along the streets —Brian Moore
  15. There came a wind like a bugle —Emily Dickinson

    This is both title and first line of a poem.

  16. The warm spring wind fluttered against his face like an old kiss —Michael Malone
  17. Wind … beat like a fist against his face —Vicki Baum
  18. The wind blew gusts of wind into his face that were much like a shower-bath —Honore de Balzac
  19. The wind blew him like a sail up against a lifeboat —F. Scott Fitzgerald
  20. Wind … blowing down from a flat black sky like painted cardboard —Marge Piercy
  21. Wind … driving the dry snow along with it like a mist of powdered diamonds —Henry Van Dyke
  22. The wind drove against him like a granite cliff —Edith Wharton
  23. Wind … dry and faint, like the breath of some old woman —Joe Coomer
  24. Wind … dry and fresh as ice —Frank Ross
  25. The wind filled his shirt like a white sail —Yitzhak Shenhar
  26. The wind flicked about a little like the tail of a horse that’s trying to decide what sort of mood it’s in tonight —Douglas Adams
  27. The wind howls like a chained beast in pain —Delmore Schwartz
  28. The wind howls like air inside a shell —Tracy Daugherty
  29. The wind is like a dog that runs away —Wallace Stevens
  30. The wind is like a hand on my forehead, in caress —John Hall Wheelock
  31. Wind like a hungry coyote’s cry —Patricia Henley
  32. Wind like a perfumed woman in heat —Clive Irving
  33. The wind like a razor —Miles Gibson
  34. The wind like a saw-edged knife —Paul J. Wellman
  35. The wind [in autumn] moves like a cripple among the leaves —Wallace Stevens
  36. The wind plunged like a hawk from the swollen clouds —Ellen Glasgow
  37. (The gray winter) wind prowling like a hungry wolf just beyond the windows —George Garrett
  38. The wind ran in the street like a thin dog —Katherine Mansfield
  39. Wind ringing in their ears like well-known old songs —Hans Christian Andersen
  40. The wind rose out of the depth below them, sounding as if it were pushing boulders uphill —Martin Cruz Smith
  41. Wind … rustling the … child’s hair like grass —Marguerite Duras
  42. The wind screamed like a huge, injured thing —Scott Spencer
  43. Wind … surges into your ear like breath coming and going —Philip Levine
  44. The wind swept the snow aside, ever faster and thicker, as if it were trying to catch up with something —Boris Pasternak
  45. The wind whistled … like a pack of coyotes —Paige Mitchell
  46. A wind will … knock like a rifle-butt against the door —Wallace Stevens

    The comparison appears in Stevens’ poem, The Auroras of Autumn. The full line from which the rifle-butt comparison is taken includes “A wind will spread its windy grandeurs round and …”

Similes Dictionary, 1st Edition. © 1988 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

wind

Wind can be a noun or a verb.

1. used as a noun

The wind /wɪnd/ is a current of air moving across the earth’s surface.

An icy wind brought clouds of snow.

Leaves were being blown along by the wind.

2. used as a verb

The verb wind /waɪnd/ has a completely different meaning. If a road or river winds in a particular direction, it goes in that direction with a lot of bends.

The river winds through miles of beautiful countryside.

The past tense and -ed participle of this verb is wound, pronounced /waʊnd/.

The road wound across the desolate plain.

You can also wind /waɪnd/ something around something else. For example, you can wind a wire around a stick. This means that you wrap the wire around the stick several times.

She started to wind the bandage around her arm.

He had a long scarf wound round his neck.

When you wind /waɪnd/ something such as a watch or a clock, you turn a knob or handle several times in order to make it operate.

I hadn’t wound my watch so I didn’t know the time.

3. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/wound”

Wound can also be pronounced /wuːnd/. When it is pronounced like this, it is a noun or a verb, and it has a completely different meaning. A wound is damage to a part of your body, caused by a weapon.

They treated a soldier with a leg wound.

If someone wounds you, they damage your body using a weapon.

Her father was badly wounded in the war.

Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012

wind

(current of air)

Past participle: winded
Gerund: winding

Present
I wind
you wind
he/she/it winds
we wind
you wind
they wind
Preterite
I winded
you winded
he/she/it winded
we winded
you winded
they winded
Present Continuous
I am winding
you are winding
he/she/it is winding
we are winding
you are winding
they are winding
Present Perfect
I have winded
you have winded
he/she/it has winded
we have winded
you have winded
they have winded
Past Continuous
I was winding
you were winding
he/she/it was winding
we were winding
you were winding
they were winding
Past Perfect
I had winded
you had winded
he/she/it had winded
we had winded
you had winded
they had winded
Future
I will wind
you will wind
he/she/it will wind
we will wind
you will wind
they will wind
Future Perfect
I will have winded
you will have winded
he/she/it will have winded
we will have winded
you will have winded
they will have winded
Future Continuous
I will be winding
you will be winding
he/she/it will be winding
we will be winding
you will be winding
they will be winding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been winding
you have been winding
he/she/it has been winding
we have been winding
you have been winding
they have been winding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been winding
you will have been winding
he/she/it will have been winding
we will have been winding
you will have been winding
they will have been winding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been winding
you had been winding
he/she/it had been winding
we had been winding
you had been winding
they had been winding
Conditional
I would wind
you would wind
he/she/it would wind
we would wind
you would wind
they would wind
Past Conditional
I would have winded
you would have winded
he/she/it would have winded
we would have winded
you would have winded
they would have winded

wind

(coil or twist)

Past participle: wound
Gerund: winding

Present
I wind
you wind
he/she/it winds
we wind
you wind
they wind
Preterite
I wound
you wound
he/she/it wound
we wound
you wound
they wound
Present Continuous
I am winding
you are winding
he/she/it is winding
we are winding
you are winding
they are winding
Present Perfect
I have wound
you have wound
he/she/it has wound
we have wound
you have wound
they have wound
Past Continuous
I was winding
you were winding
he/she/it was winding
we were winding
you were winding
they were winding
Past Perfect
I had wound
you had wound
he/she/it had wound
we had wound
you had wound
they had wound
Future
I will wind
you will wind
he/she/it will wind
we will wind
you will wind
they will wind
Future Perfect
I will have wound
you will have wound
he/she/it will have wound
we will have wound
you will have wound
they will have wound
Future Continuous
I will be winding
you will be winding
he/she/it will be winding
we will be winding
you will be winding
they will be winding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been winding
you have been winding
he/she/it has been winding
we have been winding
you have been winding
they have been winding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been winding
you will have been winding
he/she/it will have been winding
we will have been winding
you will have been winding
they will have been winding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been winding
you had been winding
he/she/it had been winding
we had been winding
you had been winding
they had been winding
Conditional
I would wind
you would wind
he/she/it would wind
we would wind
you would wind
they would wind
Past Conditional
I would have wound
you would have wound
he/she/it would have wound
we would have wound
you would have wound
they would have wound

wind

(blow bugle etc.)

Past participle: winded/wound
Gerund: winding

Present
I wind
you wind
he/she/it winds
we wind
you wind
they wind
Preterite
I winded/wound
you winded/wound
he/she/it winded/wound
we winded/wound
you winded/wound
they winded/wound
Present Continuous
I am winding
you are winding
he/she/it is winding
we are winding
you are winding
they are winding
Present Perfect
I have winded/wound
you have winded/wound
he/she/it has winded/wound
we have winded/wound
you have winded/wound
they have winded/wound
Past Continuous
I was winding
you were winding
he/she/it was winding
we were winding
you were winding
they were winding
Past Perfect
I had winded/wound
you had winded/wound
he/she/it had winded/wound
we had winded/wound
you had winded/wound
they had winded/wound
Future
I will wind
you will wind
he/she/it will wind
we will wind
you will wind
they will wind
Future Perfect
I will have winded/wound
you will have winded/wound
he/she/it will have winded/wound
we will have winded/wound
you will have winded/wound
they will have winded/wound
Future Continuous
I will be winding
you will be winding
he/she/it will be winding
we will be winding
you will be winding
they will be winding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been winding
you have been winding
he/she/it has been winding
we have been winding
you have been winding
they have been winding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been winding
you will have been winding
he/she/it will have been winding
we will have been winding
you will have been winding
they will have been winding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been winding
you had been winding
he/she/it had been winding
we had been winding
you had been winding
they had been winding
Conditional
I would wind
you would wind
he/she/it would wind
we would wind
you would wind
they would wind
Past Conditional
I would have winded/wound
you would have winded/wound
he/she/it would have winded/wound
we would have winded/wound
you would have winded/wound
they would have winded/wound

Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

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