definition of viii by The Free Dictionary

[*]

With the exception perhaps of the “Hymn to Ares” (viii), no item in the collection can be regarded as either devotional or liturgical.

A comparison of this work with the Lay of Demodocus (“Odyssey” viii, 266 ff.), which is superficially similar, will show how far superior is the former in which the goddess is but a victim to forces stronger than herself.

About eighteen months or two years after the events which terminate this story, when search was made in that cavern for the body of Olivier le Daim, who had been hanged two days previously, and to whom Charles VIII. had granted the favor of being buried in Saint Laurent, in better company, they found among all those hideous carcasses two skeletons, one of which held the other in its embrace.

There are the ruins of an old priory in the grounds of Ankerwyke House, which is close to Picnic Point, and it was round about the grounds of this old priory that Henry VIII. is said to have waited for and met Anne Boleyn.

It must have been much like this when that foolish boy Henry VIII. was courting his little Anne.

[+] Charles VIII, King of France, born 1470, died 1498.

[*] Louis XII divorced his wife, Jeanne, daughter of Louis XI, and married in 1499 Anne of Brittany, widow of Charles VIII, in order to retain the Duchy of Brittany for the crown.

* NOTE.–Wherever the Report touches on the events of the birthday, or of the three days that followed it, compare with Betteredge’s Narrative, chapters viii. to xiii.
Very likely it had remained in some quiet monastery library for hundreds of years until Henry VIII. scattered the monks and their books.
And in that case, according to the definition in Lecture VIII, its non-mnemic elements will be sensations.
The ambitious cardinal, who was prime minister to Henry VIII., permitting his vanity to aspire to the triple crown,[5] entertained hopes of succeeding in the acquisition of that splendid prize by the influence of the Emperor Charles V.
{il y a Bourbon et Bourbon = there are Bourbons and Bourbons (i.e., they’re all the same); “What is bred in the bone….” = a possibly deliberate misquotation of “It will not out of the flesh that is bred in the bone” from John Heywood, “Proverbes”, Part II, Chapter VIII (1546)}

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