definition of Toos by The Free Dictionary

too

(tu)

adv.

1. in addition; also; furthermore; moreover: young, clever, and rich too.

2. to an excessive or marked degree; beyond what is usual, desirable, fitting, etc.: too sick to travel; too suprised for words.

3. more, as specified, than should be: too near the fire.

4. (used as an emphatic affirmative to contradict a negative statement): I am too!

5. extremely; very (usu. with a negative): none too pleased with the results.

[before 900; Middle English to, Old English, stressed variant of to (adv.), sp. too since the 16th century]

Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

also

– too – as well

You use also, too, or as well when you are giving more information about something.

1. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/also”

Also is usually used in front of a verb. If there is no auxiliary verb, you put also immediately in front of the verb, unless the verb is be.

I also began to be interested in cricket.

They also helped out.

If the verb is be, you put also after it.

I was also an American.

If there is an auxiliary verb, you put also after the auxiliary verb.

The symptoms of the illness were also described in the book.

If there is more than one auxiliary verb, you put also after the first one.

We‘ll also be learning about healthy eating.

Also is sometimes put at the beginning of a clause.

She is very intelligent. Also, she is gorgeous.

Be Careful!
Don’t put also at the end of a clause.

2. ‘too’

You usually put too at the end of a clause.

Now the problem affects middle-class children, too.

I’ll miss you, and Steve will, too.

In conversation, too is used after a word or phrase when you are making a brief comment on something that has just been said.

‘His father kicked him out of the house.’ – ‘Quite right, too.’

‘They’ve finished mending the road.’ – ‘About time, too!’

Too is sometimes put after the first noun phrase in a clause.

I wondered whether I too would become ill.

, Melissa, too, felt miserable.

However, the position of too can make a difference to the meaning of a sentence. ‘I am an American too‘ can mean either ‘Like the person just mentioned, I am an American’ or ‘Besides having the other qualities just mentioned, I am an American’. However, ‘I too am an American’ can only mean ‘Like the person just mentioned, I am an American’.

Don’t put too at the beginning of a sentence.

For more information, see too

3. ‘as well’

As well always goes at the end of a clause.

Filter coffee is better for your health than instant coffee. And it tastes nicer as well.

They will have a difficult year next year as well.

4. negatives

You don’t usually use “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/also”, ‘too’, or ‘as well’ in negative clauses. Don’t say, for example, ‘I’m not hungry and she’s not hungry too‘. You say ‘I’m not hungry and she’s not hungry either‘, ‘I’m not hungry and neither is she‘, or ‘I’m not hungry and nor is she‘.

Edward wasn’t at the ceremony, either.

‘I don’t normally drink coffee in the evening.’ – ‘Neither do I.


so

– very – too

So, very, and too can all be used to intensify the meaning of an adjective, an adverb, or a word like much or many.

1. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/very”

Very is a simple intensifier, without any other meaning.

The room was very small.

We finished very quickly.

2. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/so”

So can suggest an emotion in the speaker, such as pleasure, surprise, or disappointment.

Juan makes me so angry!

Oh, thank you so much!

So can also refer forward to a result clause introduced by that.

The traffic was moving so slowly that he arrived three hours late.

3. ‘too’

Too suggests an excessive or undesirable amount.

The soup is too salty.

She wears too much make-up.

Too can be used with a to-infinitive or with for to say that a particular result does not or cannot happen.

He was too late to save her.

The water was too cold for swimming.

See too


too

Too can be an adverb or a grading adverb.

1. used as an adverb

You use too as an adverb to show that what has just been said applies to or includes someone or something else.

Of course, you’re a teacher too, aren’t you?

Hey, where are you from? Brooklyn? Me too!

2. used as a grading adverb

You use too in front of an adjective or adverb to say that an amount or degree of a quality is more than is needed or wanted.

By then he was far too tall for his little bed.

I realized my mistake too late.

Don’t use “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/very” in front of too. Don’t say, for example, ‘The hat was very too small for her‘. Say ‘The hat was much too small for her’ or ‘The hat was far too small for her’.

That may seem much too expensive.

You can use rather, slightly, or a bit in front of too.

The dress was rather too small for her.

His hair had grown slightly too long over his ears.

I’m afraid the price may just be a bit too high.

Be Careful!
Don’t use ‘fairly’, ‘quite’, or ‘pretty’ in front of too.

You don’t normally use too with an adjective in front of a noun. Don’t say, for example, ‘These are too big boots‘. You say ‘These boots are too big‘.

However, too is sometimes used with an adjective in front of a noun in formal or literary English. A or an is put after the adjective. For example, you can say ‘This is too complex a problem to be dealt with here’. Don’t say ‘This is a too complex problem to be dealt with here‘.

That’s too easy an answer.

Somehow, Vadim seems too nice a man for the job.

3. used as an intensifier

Some people use too in front of words like kind to say how grateful they are. This is fairly formal.

You’re too kind.

However, you don’t usually use ‘too’ in front of an adjective or adverb simply to emphasize it. Don’t say, for example, ‘I am too pleased with my new car‘. The word you use is very.

She was upset and very angry.

Think very carefully.

4. ‘too much’ and ‘too many’

You can use too much with an uncountable noun to say that there is more of something than is needed or wanted.

They said I was earning too much money.

You can also say that there is too little of something.

There would be too little moisture for the plants to grow.

You can use too many with a countable noun to say that there are more people or things than are needed or wanted.

I was making too many mistakes.

You can also say that there are too few people or things.

Too few people nowadays are interested in literature.

You can use much too much or far too much with an uncountable noun to say that there is very much more of something than is necessary or desirable.

This would leave much too much power in the hands of the judges.

These people are getting far too much attention.

You can use far too many with a countable noun to say that there is a much larger number of people or things than is necessary or desirable. Don’t say that there are ‘much too many‘ of them.

Every middle-class child gets far too many toys.

Be Careful!
Don’t use too much or much too much in front of an adjective which is not followed by a noun. Don’t say, for example, ‘It’s too much hot to play football‘. Say ‘It’s too hot to play football’ or ‘It’s much too hot to play football’.

Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012

Leave a Comment