definition of prices by The Free Dictionary

price

 (prīs)

n.

1. The amount as of money or goods, asked for or given in exchange for something else.

2. The cost at which something is obtained: believes that the price of success is hard work.

3. The cost of bribing someone: maintained that every person has a price.

4. A reward offered for the capture or killing of a person: a felon with a price on his head.

5. Archaic Value or worth.

tr.v. priced, pric·ing, pric·es

1. To fix or establish a price for: shoes that are priced at sixty dollars.

2. To find out the price of: spent the day pricing dresses.

Idiom:

price out of the market

To eliminate the demand for (goods or services) by setting prices too high.



price′a·ble adj.

pric′er n.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

price

(praɪs)

n

1. the sum in money or goods for which anything is or may be bought or sold

2. the cost at which anything is obtained

3. the cost of bribing a person

4. a sum of money offered or given as a reward for a capture or killing

5. value or worth, esp high worth

6. (Gambling, except Cards) gambling another word for odds

7. at any price whatever the price or cost

8. at a price at a high price

9. beyond price without price invaluable or priceless

10. the price of someone Irish what someone deserves, esp a fitting punishment: it’s just the price of him.

11. what price something? what are the chances of something happening now?

vb (tr)

12. to fix or establish the price of

13. to ascertain or discover the price of

14. (Commerce) price out of the market to charge so highly for as to prevent the sale, hire, etc, of

[C13 pris, from Old French, from Latin pretium price, value, wage]

ˈpricer n

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

price

(praɪs)

n., v. priced, pric•ing. n.

1. the sum or amount of money or its equivalent for which anything is bought, sold, or offered for sale.

2. a sum offered for the capture of a person alive or dead: to put a price on someone’s head.

3. an amount of money for which a person will forsake principles or obligations: They claim that every politician has his price.

4. that which must be given, done, or undergone in order to obtain a thing.

5. Archaic. value or worth.

v.t.

6. to fix the price of.

7. to ask or find out the price of.

[1175–1225; Middle English pris(e) < Old French < Latin pretium price, value, worth]

Price

(praɪs)

n.

1. (Edward) Reynolds, born 1933, U.S. novelist.

2. (Mary) Le•on•tyne (ˈli ənˌtin) born 1927, U.S. soprano.

Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

price

– cost

1. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/price” and “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/cost”

The price or cost of something is the amount of money you must pay to buy it.

The price of oil doubled in a few months.

They are worried about the rising cost of food.

You can also use cost to refer to the amount of money needed to do or make something.

The cost of raising a child is very high.

The building was recently restored at a cost of £500,000.

Be Careful!
Don’t use “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/price” in this way. Don’t say, for example, ‘The price of raising a child is very high.’

2. ‘costs’

You use the plural noun costs when you are referring to the total amount of money needed to run something such as a business.

We need to cut our costs in order to make a profit.

Stores have had to raise their prices to cover increased costs.

3. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/cost” used as a verb

You use cost as a verb to talk about the amount of money that you must pay for something.

The dress costs $200.

How much do these new phones cost?

You can use cost with two objects to say how much money someone pays for something on a particular occasion. The past tense and -ed participle of cost is cost.

A two-day stay there cost me $125.

How much did that haircut cost you?

Be Careful!
Don’t use ‘to’ after cost in a sentence like this. Don’t say, for example, ‘How much did that haircut cost to you?’


price

– prize

1. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/price”

The price /praɪs/ of something is the amount of money that you must pay to buy it.

The price of a cup of coffee is almost five dollars.

The price is shown on the label.

See price – cost

2. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/prize”

A prize /praɪz/ is something given to someone for winning a competition or game, or for doing good work.

He won a prize in a painting competition.

She was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace.

Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012

price

Past participle: priced
Gerund: pricing

Present
I price
you price
he/she/it prices
we price
you price
they price
Preterite
I priced
you priced
he/she/it priced
we priced
you priced
they priced
Present Continuous
I am pricing
you are pricing
he/she/it is pricing
we are pricing
you are pricing
they are pricing
Present Perfect
I have priced
you have priced
he/she/it has priced
we have priced
you have priced
they have priced
Past Continuous
I was pricing
you were pricing
he/she/it was pricing
we were pricing
you were pricing
they were pricing
Past Perfect
I had priced
you had priced
he/she/it had priced
we had priced
you had priced
they had priced
Future
I will price
you will price
he/she/it will price
we will price
you will price
they will price
Future Perfect
I will have priced
you will have priced
he/she/it will have priced
we will have priced
you will have priced
they will have priced
Future Continuous
I will be pricing
you will be pricing
he/she/it will be pricing
we will be pricing
you will be pricing
they will be pricing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pricing
you have been pricing
he/she/it has been pricing
we have been pricing
you have been pricing
they have been pricing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pricing
you will have been pricing
he/she/it will have been pricing
we will have been pricing
you will have been pricing
they will have been pricing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pricing
you had been pricing
he/she/it had been pricing
we had been pricing
you had been pricing
they had been pricing
Conditional
I would price
you would price
he/she/it would price
we would price
you would price
they would price
Past Conditional
I would have priced
you would have priced
he/she/it would have priced
we would have priced
you would have priced
they would have priced

Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

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