definition of plurality by The Free Dictionary

The body is a big sagacity, a plurality with one sense, a war and a peace, a flock and a shepherd.
If, in addition to the consideration of a plurality of civil lists, we take into view the number of persons who must necessarily be employed to guard the inland communication between the different confederacies against illicit trade, and who in time will infallibly spring up out of the necessities of revenue; and if we also take into view the military establishments which it has been shown would unavoidably result from the jealousies and conflicts of the several nations into which the States would be divided, we shall clearly discover that a separation would be not less injurious to the economy, than to the tranquillity, commerce, revenue, and liberty of every part.
He is himself his own World, his own Universe; of any other than himself he can form no conception; he knows not Length, nor Breadth, nor Height, for he has had no experience of them; he has no cognizance even of the number Two; nor has he a thought of Plurality; for he is himself his One and All, being really Nothing.
It will be no alleviation, that these powers will be exercised by a plurality of hands, and not by a single one.
Most of them intermarry with the natives, and, like the latter, have often a plurality of wives.
And, finally, although such be the ground of our opinions, I remarked that a plurality of suffrages is no guarantee of truth where it is at all of difficult discovery, as in such cases it is much more likely that it will be found by one than by many.
Even the Jews in the interior have a plurality of wives.
Somewhat later another Frenchman, named Fontenelle, wrote `The Plurality of Worlds,’ a chef-d’oeuvre of its time.
A regular system of polygamy exists among the islanders; but of a most extraordinary nature,–a plurality of husbands, instead of wives!
“`Not without regard to the import of the word as conveying unity or plurality of idea’–tell me again what that means, Ben.”
Can there be any greater evil than discord and distraction and plurality where unity ought to reign?
Mrs Squeers, when excited, was accustomed to use strong language, and, moreover, to make use of a plurality of epithets, some of which were of a figurative kind, as the word peacock, and furthermore the allusion to Nicholas’s nose, which was not intended to be taken in its literal sense, but rather to bear a latitude of construction according to the fancy of the hearers.

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