definition of cheapest by The Free Dictionary

cheap

not expensive; poor; shoddy

Not to be confused with:

cheep – to chirp or peep

Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

cheap

 (chēp)

adj. cheap·er, cheap·est

1.

a. Relatively low in cost; inexpensive or comparatively inexpensive.

b. Charging low prices: a cheap restaurant.

2.

a. Obtainable at a low rate of interest. Used especially of money.

b. Devalued, as in buying power: cheap dollars.

3. Achieved with little effort: a cheap victory; cheap laughs.

4. Of or considered of small value: in wartime, when life was cheap.

5. Of poor quality; inferior: a cheap toy.

6. Worthy of no respect; vulgar or contemptible: a cheap gangster.

7. Stingy; miserly.

adv. cheaper, cheapest

Inexpensively: got the new car cheap.

Idioms:

cheap at twice the price

Extremely inexpensive.

on the cheap

By inexpensive means; cheaply: traveled to Europe on the cheap.


[From Middle English (god) chep, (good) price, purchase, bargain, from Old English cēap, trade, from Latin caupō, shopkeeper.]


cheap′ly adv.

cheap′ness n.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cheap

(tʃiːp)

adj

1. costing relatively little; inexpensive; good value

2. charging low prices: a cheap hairdresser.

3. of poor quality; shoddy: cheap furniture; cheap and nasty.

4. worth relatively little: promises are cheap.

5. not worthy of respect; vulgar

6. ashamed; embarrassed: to feel cheap.

7. stingy; miserly

8. informal mean; despicable: a cheap liar.

9. cheap as chips See chip11

10. dirt cheap informal extremely inexpensive

n

on the cheap informal Brit at a low cost

[Old English ceap barter, bargain, price, property; related to Old Norse kaup bargain, Old High German kouf trade, Latin caupō innkeeper]

ˈcheapish adj

ˈcheaply adv

ˈcheapness n

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cheap

(tʃip)

adj. -er, -est,
adv., n. adj.

1. costing very little; relatively low in price; inexpensive.

2. charging low prices: a cheap store.

3. shoddy or inferior.

4. costing little labor or trouble: Talk is cheap.

5. mean or contemptible: a cheap joke.

6. of little account or value: Life was cheap.

7. embarrassed; sheepish.

8. stingy; miserly.

9. (of money) able to be borrowed at low interest.

10. of decreased value or purchasing power.

adv.

11. at a low price or small cost.

n.

12. on the cheap, inexpensively; economically.

Idiom.

[before 900; Middle English chep (short for phrases, as god chep(e) inexpensive), Old English cēap bargain, caupō innkeeper, tradesman; compare chapman]

cheap′ly, adv.

cheap′ness, n.

syn: cheap, inexpensive agree in their suggestion of low cost. cheap now often suggests shoddiness, inferiority, showy imitation, unworthiness, and the like: a cheap fabric. inexpensive emphasizes lowness of price (although more expensive than cheap) and suggests that the value is fully equal to the cost: an inexpensive dress. It is often used as an evasion for the more pejorative cheap.

Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cheap

– cheaply

1. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/cheap” as an adjective

Cheap goods or services cost less than other goods or services of the same type.

cheap red wine.

cheap plastic buckets.

A solid fuel cooker is cheap to run.

2. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/cheap” as an adverb

In conversation, cheap can also be an adverb, but only with verbs which refer to the buying, selling, or hiring of things.

I thought you got it very cheap.

You can hire boots pretty cheap.

3. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/cheaply”

With other verbs, the adverb you use is cheaply.

You can play golf comparatively cheaply.

In fact you can travel just as cheaply by British Airways.

4. “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/low”

You do not say that things such as wages, costs, or payments are “https://www.thefreedictionary.com/cheap”. You say that they are low.

If your family has a low income, you can apply for a student grant.

…tasty meals at a fairly low cost.

Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012

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