definition of boil by The Free Dictionary

boil 1

 (boil)

v. boiled, boil·ing, boils

v.intr.

1.

a. To change from a liquid to a vapor by the application of heat: All the water boiled away and left the kettle dry.

b. To reach the boiling point.

c. To undergo the action of boiling, especially in being cooked.

2. To be in a state of agitation; seethe: a river boiling over the rocks.

3. To be stirred up or greatly excited, especially in anger: The mere idea made me boil.

v.tr.

1.

a. To vaporize (a liquid) by the application of heat.

b. To heat to the boiling point.

2. To cook or clean by boiling.

3. To separate by evaporation in the process of boiling: boil the maple sap.

n.

1. The condition or act of boiling.

2. Lower Southern US A picnic featuring shrimp, crab, or crayfish boiled in large pots with spices, and then shelled and eaten by hand.

3. An agitated, swirling, roiling mass of liquid: “Those tumbling boils show a dissolving bar and a changing channel there” (Mark Twain).

Phrasal Verbs:

boil down

1. To reduce in bulk or size by boiling.

2. To condense; summarize: boiled down the complex document.

3. To constitute the equivalent of in summary: The scathing editorial simply boils down to an exercise in partisan politics.

boil over

1. To overflow while boiling.

2. To lose one’s temper.


[Middle English boillen, from Old French boillir, from Latin bullīre, from bulla, bubble.]


boil′a·ble adj.

Synonyms: boil1, simmer, seethe, stew
These verbs mean, both literally and figuratively, to stir up or agitate. To boil is to heat a liquid until it churns with bubbles. Figuratively it pertains to intense agitation, often from anger: She boiled with rage at the insult.
Simmer denotes gentle cooking just at or below the boiling point. Figuratively it refers to a state of slow, contained ferment: Plans were simmering in his mind. The employees simmered with resentment over the cut in benefits.
To seethe is to boil steadily and vigorously. Its figurative usage can suggest vigorous activity or passionate emotion: “The arc lamp’s cone of light seethes with winged insects” (Claire Davis).“The city had … been seething with discontent” (John R. Green).
Stew refers literally to slow boiling and figuratively to a persistent but not violent state of agitation: “They don’t want a man to fret and stew about his work” (William H. Whyte, Jr.).


boil 2

 (boil)

n.

A painful, circumscribed pus-filled inflammation of the skin and subcutaneous tissue usually caused by a local staphylococcal infection. Also called furuncle.


[Middle English bile, from Old English bȳle.]

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

boil

(bɔɪl)

vb

1. (Chemistry) to change or cause to change from a liquid to a vapour so rapidly that bubbles of vapour are formed copiously in the liquid. Compare evaporate

2. to reach or cause to reach boiling point

3. (Cookery) to cook or be cooked by the process of boiling

4. (intr) to bubble and be agitated like something boiling; seethe: the ocean was boiling.

5. (intr) to be extremely angry or indignant (esp in the phrase make one’s blood boil): she was boiling at his dishonesty.

6. (intr) to contain a boiling liquid: the pot is boiling.

n

the state or action of boiling (esp in the phrases on the boil, off the boil)

[C13: from Old French boillir, from Latin bullīre to bubble, from bulla a bubble]

ˈboilable adj


boil

(bɔɪl)

n

(Pathology) a red painful swelling with a hard pus-filled core caused by bacterial infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, esp at a hair follicle. Technical name: furuncle

[Old English bӯle; related to Old Norse beyla swelling, Old High German būlla bladder, Gothic ufbauljan to inflate]

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

boil1

(bɔɪl)
v.i.

1. to change from a liquid to a gaseous state, typically as a result of heat, producing bubbles of gas that rise to the surface of the liquid.

2. to reach the boiling point.

3. to be in an agitated or violent state: The sea boiled in the storm.

4. to be deeply angry or upset.

5. to contain, or be contained in, a liquid that boils: The kettle is boiling. Don’t let the vegetables boil.

v.t.

6. to bring to the boiling point.

7. to cook (something) in boiling water: to boil eggs.

8. to separate (salt, sugar, etc.) from a solution containing it by boiling off the liquid.

9. boil down,

a. to reduce or lessen by boiling.

b. to shorten; abridge.

10. boil down to, to be reduced to; amount to: It boils down to a question of ethics.

11. boil over,

a. to overflow while or as if while boiling; erupt.

b. to be unable to repress anger, excitement, etc.

n.

12. the act or state of boiling: Bring the water to a boil.

13. an area of agitated, swirling water.

[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French boillir < Latin bullīre to effervesce, boil, v. derivative of bulla bubble]

syn: boil, seethe, simmer, stew are used figuratively to refer to agitated states of emotion. To boil suggests being very hot with anger or rage: He was boiling when the guests arrived late. To seethe is to be deeply stirred, violently agitated, or greatly excited: a mind seething with conflicting ideas. To simmer means to be at the point of bursting out or boiling over: to simmer with curiosity; to simmer with anger. To stew is an informal term that means to worry, or to be in a restless state of anxiety and excitement: to stew over one’s troubles.

boil2

(bɔɪl)

n.

a painful circumscribed inflammation of the skin with a pus-filled inner core.

[before 1000; Middle English bile, bule, Old English bȳle; c. Old Saxon bula, Old High German bulla; akin to Old Norse beyla hump]

Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

boil

(boil)

Verb

To change from a liquid to a gaseous state by heating or being heated to the boiling point.

Noun

The act or condition of boiling: brought the water to a boil.

The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

boil

Past participle: boiled
Gerund: boiling

Present
I boil
you boil
he/she/it boils
we boil
you boil
they boil
Preterite
I boiled
you boiled
he/she/it boiled
we boiled
you boiled
they boiled
Present Continuous
I am boiling
you are boiling
he/she/it is boiling
we are boiling
you are boiling
they are boiling
Present Perfect
I have boiled
you have boiled
he/she/it has boiled
we have boiled
you have boiled
they have boiled
Past Continuous
I was boiling
you were boiling
he/she/it was boiling
we were boiling
you were boiling
they were boiling
Past Perfect
I had boiled
you had boiled
he/she/it had boiled
we had boiled
you had boiled
they had boiled
Future
I will boil
you will boil
he/she/it will boil
we will boil
you will boil
they will boil
Future Perfect
I will have boiled
you will have boiled
he/she/it will have boiled
we will have boiled
you will have boiled
they will have boiled
Future Continuous
I will be boiling
you will be boiling
he/she/it will be boiling
we will be boiling
you will be boiling
they will be boiling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been boiling
you have been boiling
he/she/it has been boiling
we have been boiling
you have been boiling
they have been boiling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been boiling
you will have been boiling
he/she/it will have been boiling
we will have been boiling
you will have been boiling
they will have been boiling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been boiling
you had been boiling
he/she/it had been boiling
we had been boiling
you had been boiling
they had been boiling
Conditional
I would boil
you would boil
he/she/it would boil
we would boil
you would boil
they would boil
Past Conditional
I would have boiled
you would have boiled
he/she/it would have boiled
we would have boiled
you would have boiled
they would have boiled

Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

boil

To cook in water at 212 °F. At this temperature water bubbles rapidly.

Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited

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