definition of billet by The Free Dictionary

bil·let 1

 (bĭl′ĭt)

n.

1.

a. Lodging for troops.

b. A written order directing that such lodging be provided.

2. A position of employment; a job.

3. Archaic A short letter; a note.

v. bil·let·ed, bil·let·ing, bil·lets

v.tr.

1.

a. To lodge (soldiers).

b. To serve (a person) with a written order to provide lodging for soldiers.

2. To assign lodging to.

v.intr.

To be quartered; lodge.


[Middle English, official register, from Old French billette, from bullette, diminutive of bulle, document, from Medieval Latin bulla, document, seal; see bill1.]


bil·let 2

 (bĭl′ĭt)

n.

1. A short, thick piece of wood, especially one used as firewood.

2. One of a series of regularly spaced, log-shaped segments used as an ornamental motif on moldings in Norman architecture.

3.

a. A small, usually rectangular bar of iron or steel in an intermediate stage of manufacture.

b. A small ingot of nonferrous metal.

4.

a. The part of a harness strap that passes through a buckle.

b. A loop or pocket for securing the end of a buckled harness strap.


[Middle English, from Old French billette, diminutive of bille, log, from Vulgar Latin *bilia, possibly of Celtic origin.]

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

billet

(ˈbɪlɪt)

n

1. (Military) accommodation, esp for a soldier, in civilian lodgings

2. (Military) the official requisition for such lodgings

3. (Nautical Terms) a space or berth allocated, esp for slinging a hammock, in a ship

4. informal a job

5. archaic a brief letter or document

vb, -lets, -leting or -leted

6. (Military) (tr) to assign a lodging to (a soldier)

7. (tr) informal to assign to a post or job

8. to lodge or be lodged

[C15: from Old French billette, from bulle a document; see bull3]

ˌbilletˈee n

ˈbilleter n


billet

(ˈbɪlɪt)

n

1. a chunk of wood, esp for fuel

2. (Metallurgy) metallurgy

a. a metal bar of square or circular cross section

b. an ingot cast into the shape of a prism

3. (Architecture) architect a carved ornament in a moulding, with short cylinders or blocks evenly spaced

[C15: from Old French billette a little log, from bille log, probably of Celtic origin]

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bil•let1

(ˈbɪl ɪt)

n.

1. lodging for a soldier, student, etc., as in a private home or nonmilitary public building.

2. an official order directing the addressee to provide such lodging.

3. a bunk, berth, or the like, assigned to a member of a ship’s crew.

4. job; position; appointment.

5. Archaic. a short letter; note.

v.t.

6. to direct (a soldier) by ticket, note, or verbal order, where to lodge.

7. to provide lodging for; quarter.

v.i.

8. to be quartered; stay.

[1375–1425; late Middle English bylet, billett official register < Anglo-French billette, Old French bullette]

bil•let2

(ˈbɪl ɪt)

n.

1. a small chunk of wood, esp. a short section of a log cut for fuel.

2. a narrow steel bar, esp. one rolled or forged from an ingot.

3. one of a series of closely spaced cylinders, often in several rows, forming a molding or cornice.

[1400–50; late Middle English bylet, bel(l) et billette=bille log, tree trunk (*bilia tree trunk; compare Old Irish bile landmark tree) + -ette -ette]

Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

billet

– A civilian house where soldiers are lodged temporarily; a billet is also a thick piece of wood, from Latin billa/billus, “branch, trunk.”

See also related terms for trunk.

Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

billet

1. Shelter for troops.
2. To quarter troops.
3. A personnel position or assignment that may be filled by one person.

Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.

billet

Past participle: billeted
Gerund: billeting

Present
I billet
you billet
he/she/it billets
we billet
you billet
they billet
Preterite
I billeted
you billeted
he/she/it billeted
we billeted
you billeted
they billeted
Present Continuous
I am billeting
you are billeting
he/she/it is billeting
we are billeting
you are billeting
they are billeting
Present Perfect
I have billeted
you have billeted
he/she/it has billeted
we have billeted
you have billeted
they have billeted
Past Continuous
I was billeting
you were billeting
he/she/it was billeting
we were billeting
you were billeting
they were billeting
Past Perfect
I had billeted
you had billeted
he/she/it had billeted
we had billeted
you had billeted
they had billeted
Future
I will billet
you will billet
he/she/it will billet
we will billet
you will billet
they will billet
Future Perfect
I will have billeted
you will have billeted
he/she/it will have billeted
we will have billeted
you will have billeted
they will have billeted
Future Continuous
I will be billeting
you will be billeting
he/she/it will be billeting
we will be billeting
you will be billeting
they will be billeting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been billeting
you have been billeting
he/she/it has been billeting
we have been billeting
you have been billeting
they have been billeting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been billeting
you will have been billeting
he/she/it will have been billeting
we will have been billeting
you will have been billeting
they will have been billeting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been billeting
you had been billeting
he/she/it had been billeting
we had been billeting
you had been billeting
they had been billeting
Conditional
I would billet
you would billet
he/she/it would billet
we would billet
you would billet
they would billet
Past Conditional
I would have billeted
you would have billeted
he/she/it would have billeted
we would have billeted
you would have billeted
they would have billeted

Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

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