definition of abomination by The Free Dictionary

Such an idol as that found in the secret groves of Queen Maachah in Judea; and for worshipping which, king Asa, her son, did depose her, and destroyed the idol, and burnt it for an abomination at the brook Kedron, as darkly set forth in the 15th chapter of the first book of Kings.
That is to say, persuaded that I should never do any good with my life, and that I was inferior even to the sole of my own boot, I took it into my head that it was absurd for me to aspire at all– rather, that I ought to account myself a disgrace and an abomination. Once a man has lost his self-respect, and has decided to abjure his better qualities and human dignity, he falls headlong, and cannot choose but do so.
The abomination of flowers, or representations of well-known objects of any kind, should not be endured within the limits of Christendom.
“This pretended foundling is a real monster of abomination,” resumed Jehanne.
A clock, in a splintered and battered oblong box of varnished wood, she suddenly regarded as an abomination. She noted that it ticked raspingly.
Now we do think bloodshed abominable and yet we engage in this abomination, and with more energy than ever.
In truth all that night had been the abomination of desolation to me.
He had told his hearers that he was altogether vile, a viler companion of the vilest, the worst of sinners, an abomination, a thing of unimaginable iniquity, and that the only wonder was that they did not see his wretched body shrivelled up before their eyes by the burning wrath of the Almighty!
“We shall see that,” said Front-de-B uf; “for by the blessed rood, which is the abomination of thy accursed tribe, thou shalt feel the extremities of fire and steel!
This was a sore abomination to the honest captain, who held their literary pretensions in great contempt.
Lynde wouldn’t go; she said horse racing was an abomination and, she being a church member, thought it her bounden duty to set a good example by staying away.
And, beneath the show of a marble palace, that pool of stagnant water, foul with many impurities, and, perhaps, tinged with blood,–that secret abomination, above which, possibly, he may say his prayers, without remembering it,–is this man’s miserable soul!

Leave a Comment

close