Are there any adjectives for “leader-like”? – English Vocabulary – English










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My classmates and I are working on a school project. One of my partners is helpful, shares a lot of useful ideas with us and sets up group meetings. He has excellent leadership skills. He is ‘leader-like’.

Are there any adjectives that mean “leader-like”? Thanks a lot.













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It’s funny – the only adjective which springs to mind, which seems to be based on a noun like ‘leader’, is “bossy” – which is definitely NOT the right word! Whistle

AMAZING! – I checked the “Reverse Dictionary” for adjectives like “like a leader” – some of the list are:
sly, evil, bossy, venal, lame, imperious, stern, male (not a good choice for International Women’s Day!). The others seem to bear no relation whatsoever.

I think you are going to have to stick to ‘leader-like’ or ‘has great leadership skills’.












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robjen wrote:

My classmates and I are working on a school project. One of my partners is helpful, shares a lot of useful ideas with us and sets up group meetings. He has excellent leadership skills. He is ‘leader-like’.

Are there any adjectives that mean “leader-like”? Thanks a lot.

Robjen: Actually, there is an adjective “leaderly” which is defined in several smaller on-line dictionaries as “befitting a leader.” Meaning the person’s characteristics are those befitting a person who is a leader. A quick check of Ngram shows that “leaderly” has been in use for a hundred years or so, though it’s a word that isn’t heard very commonly these days outside perhaps management classes and books. Per Ngram its use spiked about 30 years ago…have no idea what was going on then that would make “leaderly” commmon. There are books with “leaderly” in their titles, books on how be leaderly, etc. I have a Master in Public Administration so “leaderly” is a word I’m familiar with, but it’s probably not well-known by average folks outside of business or management circles.

DragOnspeaker’s suggestions of “leader-like” or “has great leadership skills” are fine as well, and probably much more commonly used and understood by more people.













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Why not honchous? Whistle













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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:

Why not honchous? Whistle

Mmmm – well . . . maybe . . . Think
Possibly “dudely”.

I did think of “leaderly” (as the obvious ‘noun-formed adjective’) but when I didn’t find it in the three TFD dictionaries, the Cambridge or the Oxford, I decided it must not exist.












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There seems to be a consensus on the use of adjective “leader-like” (= like a leader). It effectively conveys the desired sense.

Depending on the situation and age group of your friends/colleagues, you might like to use some additional words to describe your friend. One word that comes to my mind is “charismatic“. An individual who possesses an extraordinary ability to attract is “charismatic“.

You can also use sentences like “We tend to gravitate towards his ideas” to convey the desired sense.

Words like “charismatic“, “magnetic personality” and “gravitating” when used in appropriate sentence constructions should convey the desired sense.













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On a second thought,
how about dominant?












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Influential?












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commanding?












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magisterial?












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I don’t like the word “leaderly” – it sounds like a child’s word to me – which appears to be a jargon word used in a particular niche. Neither does it occur in the OED – the bench-mark for BE.

What we would normally say is that he possesses “leadership qualities” as Drago has already said. All the other suggestions are more personality-based – he’s charistmatic, dominant (domineering?) etc., and are not necessarily synonymous with having leadership qualities.

So I guess English has failed you, Robjen – there isn’t actually a commonly understood word for what you want!?










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